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  • Flushing the salt out of your engine.

    The fellow that told me this was a engine repair person (also a Amateur radio guy like me) but haven't had anyone else tell me this.
    For Flushing out your engine after being in Saltwater, you set your motor down in a 55 gallon drum with water up over the water intake area.
    Then you start your motor and let it start pumping on its own, then take a box of plain old baking soda and dump it into a 5 gallon bucket of Hot water, stir it up until its dissolved, dump that into your 55 gallon barrel with the engine running for at least 10 minutes.

    I have used that Salt Away but the cost of that, makes me wonder, whats in that, baking soda

    The baking soda is supposed to break down and flush the salt water out...


    So, anyone ever here of a thing like this ???
    Helmar Joe Johanesen
    1959 Skagit 20ft Offshore, 1959 Skagit 16ft Skimaster,
    1961 17ft Dorsett Catalina.1958 Uniflite 17 ft
    Outboards: 2.5 Bearcats, 3 50hp White shadow Mercs
    2 40hp Johnsons, several smaller Old kickers for a total of 12

    Our Sister club
    http://www.goldenstateglassics.com

    Oh, and Where is Robin Hood when you need him??


  • #2
    Helmar, While at the boat show, I asked the factory rep in the Mercury booth if the new engines had a place to screw in a garden hose for flushing the engine. He showed me that they did, but then for me that the Mercury engines were intended and design to run saltwater without flushing. He said it doesn't hurt them to flush them out just that it wasn't necessary.

    Now I don't for a moment doubt that he knows what he's talking about. Now the expert boaters that I grew up with said that saltwater was like ACID. You won't see me flushing my outboard with concentrated H2S04(L) either. To make is thinking work means that you have to have absolute FAITH in the coatings that Mercury uses inside their outboards.

    Dave

    14 Skagit Sportster Blue (formerly red)
    16 Skagit Skimaster (blue)
    17 Skagit

    18 Skagit Runabout (1961?)

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    • #3
      Checking some manufacturer's websites they state that the best method is "fresh water"! None of them reccomend any kind of chemical or solution. Baking soda is very basic and could actually dissolve the aluminum parts from the inside out!! I would just use fresh water for 10 minutes and be done with it...
      Brian Flaherty

      "How can you discover great lands, with your feet planted in the sand"

      1969 Chris Craft Cavalier 17 Ski Boat "Tupperware"
      1965 Performer Havoc (sold)

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      • #4
        Most of the newer engines used in salt have zinc's on them too.
        But what if you were to use a motor not built for the salt water I wonder.?
        I do see that West Marine sells a solution called Salt Away. Its over priced.
        Helmar Joe Johanesen
        1959 Skagit 20ft Offshore, 1959 Skagit 16ft Skimaster,
        1961 17ft Dorsett Catalina.1958 Uniflite 17 ft
        Outboards: 2.5 Bearcats, 3 50hp White shadow Mercs
        2 40hp Johnsons, several smaller Old kickers for a total of 12

        Our Sister club
        http://www.goldenstateglassics.com

        Oh, and Where is Robin Hood when you need him??

        Comment


        • #5
          I would stay away from any "solution" as none of the manufacturers recommend using them... Now one may argue that they are in the business of selling outboards so why would they help you protect them? But conversely they want/need their outboards to last a long time so people continue to buy their brand. I am a big fan of the KISS method for everything... "Keep it stupid simple".

          I stick with fresh water either thru the non-running flush port if you have one or with the use of either muffs or a bucket... Though I am more of a fan of the muffs as you don't recirculate the water back thru the motor. I know my old merc used to cloud up the water in just a few minutes and I don't know what all that oil would do to the cooling system.
          Brian Flaherty

          "How can you discover great lands, with your feet planted in the sand"

          1969 Chris Craft Cavalier 17 Ski Boat "Tupperware"
          1965 Performer Havoc (sold)

          Comment


          • #6
            Joe-
            If, for instance, you had a vintage motor (Homelite, Mercury, OMC) it's been customary to go to a marine store and inspect attachable zincs. They come in many shapes and sizes, have pre-drilled mounting holes (usually 2). The ideal location on outboards is the upper surface of a cavitation plate, as it's a non-critical spot not affecting the flow of water to prop. Attachment with stainless machine bolts into most likely aluminum, don't over tighten. You'd want to make absolutely sure you weren't drilling into a vertical surface of an OB-penetrating a gearcase= BAD.
            Newer motors have dedicated locations/mounting holes for zincs. When it's lost about 25% of it's mass, just change out.

            Comment


            • #7
              With you on that, Brian, muffs or specialized fittings for flushing most efficient way of getting a clean source of water to engine if it doesn't come from factory with a hose fitting.
              Here's a couple of pics to show zincs on 1964 Johnson 90 hp-gray object on cav
              plate.P1130472.jpgP1130465 - Version 2.jpgP1130466 - Version 2.jpg

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              • #8
                Hi Guys.
                I should have been more clear. I will never be able to afford a new engine so I was pretty much talking about the Old stuff, like my Volvo in the 20 Offshore and my old Bearcat. I do have some older OMC's and a Laudon?? which is about a 4 hp Aluminum 4 stroke engine.

                John Nelson was also telling me about the Zinc's that he was using. I looked at Marty's 50hp Honda 4 stroke when he had his and seen the Zinc placement too.
                So, I am thinking if I ever take my Bearcat back into salt water, I want to Zinc it up like you suggest.

                I just remembered a Long time ago some older fellow that was telling me about the baking soda trick. Could have been like one of those old wise tales too

                I tried several times to try to make it to the San Juans in my 20 offshore but it never happened for some reason or another but its on my bucket list.
                I know the engine has a Zinc rod that screws into the motor but I don't see any Zinc's on the outdrive, but I can see how to put one or more on.

                Can you use to many I wonder ?

                I am just not ready to give up my Bearcat engine to the Salt Gods so to speak ;-) Got to take care of that before I put it back in the salt.
                Helmar Joe Johanesen
                1959 Skagit 20ft Offshore, 1959 Skagit 16ft Skimaster,
                1961 17ft Dorsett Catalina.1958 Uniflite 17 ft
                Outboards: 2.5 Bearcats, 3 50hp White shadow Mercs
                2 40hp Johnsons, several smaller Old kickers for a total of 12

                Our Sister club
                http://www.goldenstateglassics.com

                Oh, and Where is Robin Hood when you need him??

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bflaherty View Post
                  I would stay away from any "solution" as none of the manufacturers recommend using them... Now one may argue that they are in the business of selling outboards so why would they help you protect them? But conversely they want/need their outboards to last a long time so people continue to buy their brand. I am a big fan of the KISS method for everything... "Keep it stupid simple".

                  I stick with fresh water either thru the non-running flush port if you have one or with the use of either muffs or a bucket... Though I am more of a fan of the muffs as you don't recirculate the water back thru the motor. I know my old merc used to cloud up the water in just a few minutes and I don't know what all that oil would do to the cooling system.
                  With my Volvo, I made a mistake of putting the hose on it and pretty much forcing water thought the engine and when doing that, my pump was going bad and didn't realize it. I took it out and before I knew it, I overheated it as my temp gauge was not working right. It would go up to about 130 and Stop. Cost me a head.
                  After that, I cut down a plastic barrel and would put under the outdrive and just kept the hose running in it to keep the water fresh.
                  I did that with the Bearcat too.
                  Helmar Joe Johanesen
                  1959 Skagit 20ft Offshore, 1959 Skagit 16ft Skimaster,
                  1961 17ft Dorsett Catalina.1958 Uniflite 17 ft
                  Outboards: 2.5 Bearcats, 3 50hp White shadow Mercs
                  2 40hp Johnsons, several smaller Old kickers for a total of 12

                  Our Sister club
                  http://www.goldenstateglassics.com

                  Oh, and Where is Robin Hood when you need him??

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Fresh water, either from a hose or our lake, is the only thing thing I circulate through my outboards. If you do the flush immediately you should be fine. The Puget Sound is too awesome not to go out on it. If the Bearcat or any other outboard crumbles to the salt gods, so be it...but I doubt it will be while I own it.
                    1958 Skagit 20 Express Hardtop
                    1958 Skagit 20 Express
                    -PNW Craftsmanship


                    Don't forget about the FAQ page if you need help with the forum:
                    http://www.classicboatclub.com/faq.php

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                    • #11
                      You guys assume everybody knows what zincs are and what there for. What are they and what are they for?? I have always used muffs and plain water and my 83 Rude has had no salt related problems in the 18 years that I've owned it.
                      Greg James

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                      • #12
                        Greg, here is a link that explains their use. http://www.boatus.com/boattech/casey...cial-zincs.asp

                        You might also check with whoever services your outboard for their input also.
                        Steve Kiesel
                        1959 Glasspar Seafair Sedan

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